"Where Paradise is Just a Howl Away"







The following states are NOT wolfdog legal

(it is illegal to own a wolfdog in these states)



Alaska

Connecticut

Georgia

Hawaii

Illinois

Maryland

Michigan

New York

Pennsyvania

Rhode Island

Wyoming















Owning a High Content Wolfdog differs greatly from owning a dog. 


A high content wolfdog is an animal that genetically contains more wolf than it does domestic dog. The behaviors are more intense, like a wolf. The appearance is very intense, like a wolf


For all intent and purposes, owning a high content is a lot like owning 

a pure wolf.


The main difference between 
a high content and a wolf is the fact that the high content is mixed with a small amount of dog (no more than 20%).

This small 
amount of dog DNA can manifest itself in a few very subtle ways, but a high content is going to always look like a wolf. 


 More about that on my content pages. 



Now that we have established that HCs are more like WOLVES than dogswe must take a deeper look into what it takes to own one of the fascinating, independent, intelligent, beautiful creatures.








So You Think You Want a High Content Wolfdog?
Here's What You Need to Do to Prepare:


Take this time to do every bit of research you can before deciding that a higher content wolfdog is right for you. There is so much more to these animals than their beauty.

They are not the kind of animal you can rehome if you decide it's not working out. These animals are a 15+ year commitment. 




Many dream of sharing their home with a wolf, but did you know that most high content wolfdogs prefer to sleep outside? They can't ever be left alone in the house, only supervised [since they feel rules don't apply when the human isn't in the room]. 

They require fencing that is either 8 feet tall with an additional 2-foot lean in along the top, or 12 feet tall without the lean in. You must have concrete or fencing along the bottom of the yard so the wolfdog can't dig out. 


A higher content is usually not reliable off-leash and if it sees a deer or something it wants to chase, it will take off, paying no mind to you calling it back. It is very rare to find a high content with impeccable recall.


They do well with other dogs but when they hit maturity they may challenge the other dogs in the house.

In order to be able to take it into a busy town, you must bring it with you every single day starting at 4-5 weeks old and be consistent in your socialization.

Sometimes consistency and lots of exposure will work and you will have a friendly ambassador wolfdog, and sometimes as they get older they start acting skittish and hyper-vigilant around people and places that it loved as a youngster.
You have to be prepared to keep the animal in a secure enclosure at home in the event your pup decides it wants to remain with the home pack rather than go out and meet people. 




I don't recommend a high content as your first wolfdog.
Even upper-mids 
can be very overwhelming for someone who is not accustomed to the self-gratifying ways of the wolfdog. He does not live to please his human, the wolfdog lives to find his own comfort, rarely if ever conceding to perform tricks or commands, and if they do learn a few basic commands, they will not perform them as reliably as a dog would.

Wolfdogs in their attitude are more like cats, looking you dead in the eye as he proceeds to knock a glass of water over despite your scoldings. 





I recommend reading the sites provided below for further learning.
The 
biggest mistake people make when getting a wolfdog is not being prepared or doing any research. They are not like dogs, and far too many people expect these animals to act like dogs if they raise them as a dog.

And that works...up until the pup is 6 months - 2 years old, and discovers his own "wolfness". Once they reach a certain age, they come to learn what they are. 



Some, as I said, will continue to enjoy being around new people and places. 
That's what we strive for in our breeding program is a domestic temperament. Most of our pups remain friendly and social throughout their lives.

But, there's still the chance of a few select pups that will be wolves in their behavior and unfortunately these pups don't discover themselves until they are older, so it's impossible to tell as babies who will be an Ambassador and who will be a "wolf". This is a risk you take when you get a high content from any breeding line---the chance of the animal not just looking like a wolf, but acting like one as well.





This is why it's important for you as the owner to expect the best but be prepared for the worst case scenario.
What if you just happen to get the pup that's alpha to everyone, has a very high prey drive, marks the furniture, eats through the walls of the house and is constantly escaping the yard?
Are you prepared for that?
Are you prepared for the worse case scenario 1000 days in a row?
Or will the animal be given away to a shelter, rescue or sanctuary if you feel you cannot handle it?





These are the important questions you must ask yourself before making any decisions.
Maybe a low content or even a nice mid would work best for you?
It may not have the pure wolf look, but is the look more important 
than the personality?




Indigo Mountain Nature Center


Wolfdog Project


Effective Wolfdog Phenotyping




Please read through all of these sites thoroughly and seriously consider all the ramifications, risks, rewards and challenges you will face when getting a wolfdog of any content.

You certainly don't want to pay money for a 
"wolf" and end up getting a husky/malamute/shepherd mix that the breeder swears up and down is a wolf. The PDF file of effective wolfdog phenotyping will help you to not get duped into buying a wolfy-looking dog as a pure wolf or high content wolfdog.

Misrepping breeders will tell you 
anything to get you to buy one of their pups, so that's why it's important for you to get educated ahead of time so a misrepper doesn't trick you into thinking "wolves are dogs and anyone can own them" because they have huskies but they call them "wolves".




Again, please do as much research as possible before making a decision to get a wolfdog of any kind, especially an animal that is over 80% wolf.